New Book: Bread, Wine, Chocolate: The Slow Loss of Foods We Love

Bread, Wine, Chocolate, a book by Simran Sethi

Bread, Wine, Chocolate –part memoir of a journey to six continents in pursuit of delicious and endangered tastes, part investigation of the loss of agricultural biodiversity from soil to plate – tells the story of what we are losing, how we are losing it, and the inspiring and tireless people and places that are bringing back the foods we love.
Simran Sethi writes “The foods I selected – bread, wine, coffee, chocolate and beer – feed me in different ways. One wakes me up, another brings me down; one nourishes my heart, and the other tends to my soul. What ties them together is that they are my constants, woven into the fabric of my life. Through these five foods, and our five senses, we’ll look at stories of loss and interconnection, exploring what is disappearing and why, and learning how we can save agrobiodiversity through various forms of conservation and through the choices we make, with every sip and bite we take.”

Keeping you up to date on orphan crops research

Photo credit : Joan Campderrós-i-Canas, modified (Creative Commons 2.0)

Learn about the Neglected and Underutilized Species (NUS) Community, its news information service and how to get involved. A quarterly newsletter and/or follow @NUS_Community on twitter to be informed about and engaged in this exciting field of agricultural development.

Wild Foods and their contribution to diets.

The properties of many African leafy vegetables in Kenya remain unexplored. Photo: Bioversity/D.Hunter

An ethnobiological inventory of available food biodiversity was carried out by means of focus group discussions, and five wild foods were selected for further modelling. A market survey assessed available food prices by season. Diets were modeled to minimize cost and maximize nutrient adequacy using the Cost of Diet linear programming tool. Modeling was done without and with wild foods.

Community Seed Banks – Origins, Evolution and Prospects

Community Seed Banks - Origins, Evolution and Prospects (Earthscan/Routledge in association with Bioversity International)

A new book published by Earthscan/Routledge in association with Bioversity International, Community Seed Banks – Origins, Evolution and Prospects, provides for the first time a global review of their development, including a wide range of case studies.

Soil-tree-crop interactions in parkland systems: A review

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The ‘parklands’ that form the most widespread farming systems in the Sahelian zone of West Africa are farming systems in which annual crops are grown under scattered trees preserved from the natural vegetation by farmers clearing the woodlands to make crop fields. Being mixed agricultural systems, the interactions between trees and crops have always been a key element determining the management options applied by farmers. A combination of field trials, observational studies and modeling has been deployed to understand soil–tree–crop interactions, including sharing of growth resources by the system components. Despite scientific advances, there are still some methodological challenges in determining the tradeoffs and synergies between and among goods and services, and how to boost the provisioning, supporting and regulating functions of such agroforestry systems. Providing such ecosystem service functions is critical in the quest for ensuring food security while achieving adaptation and mitigation goals in vulnerable environments like the drylands.

Biodiversity and Human Health: new publication!

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Healthy communities rely on well-functioning ecosystems. They provide clean air, fresh water, medicines and food security. They also limit disease and stabilize the climate. But biodiversity loss is happening at unprecedented rates, impacting human health worldwide, according to a new state of knowledge review published on 4 June by the Convention on Biological Diversity and […]