Exhibition: Agrobiodiversity in North-east India






This lady from Arunachal Pradesh, India, is using a small knife to cut rice panicles and is depositing them in the basket in her back. This photo was taken during a National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources (NBPGR, ICAR) exploration mission in 2012. Photo credit: Somnath Roy

This lady from Arunachal Pradesh, India, is using a small knife to cut rice panicles and is depositing them in the basket in her back. This photo was taken during a National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources (NBPGR, ICAR) exploration mission in 2012. Photo credit: Somnath Roy

From 3-7 November 2015, the Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research will be participating to the Indigenous Terra Madre – International Mei-Ramew Conference in Shillong, India.

The Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research, in collaboration with Bioversity International, The North East Slow Food and Agrobiodiversity Society (NESFAS), The MS Swaminathan Research Foundation (MSSRF), Local Initiatives for Biodiversity, Research and Development (LI-BIRD), the Indigenous Partnership for Agrobiodiversity and Food Sovereignty and the National Bureau for Plant Genetic Resources (NBPGR) will be organizing an exhibition on “Agrobiodiversity in North-east India” to take place in the Cultural Centre of the North East Hill University (NEHU) campus in Shillong on 4-5 November 2015.

North-east India is home to a great diversity of crops and their different varieties, domestic animal breeds, medicinal plants and wild foods. The region is also home to unique wild relatives of a number of crops. This diversity is an essential part of local food system as well as having national, regional and global importance. The exhibition will present the diversity of some important local crops and participatory approaches to enhance their use and conservation.

The different sections of the exhibition will present:

  • The rich and unique heritage of some crop species from North-east India and their varieties such as rice, taro, black gram, beans, many different vegetables, mango and citru;
  • The Community biodiversity management (CBM) approach and example of its use in the region;
  • An example of a traditional crop in India with great potential: minor millets;
  • The link between diversity and land use management bringing some case studies from North-east India and Thailand.

For more information on the exhibition, see the leaflet presentation here.

For more information on the Indigenous Terra Madre / International Mei-Ramew Conference, see their Website here.