PAR at COP11 of the CBD






There will be a lot of interesting and relevant events during COP 11 of the CBD as well as the major discussions on the agenda.

Click here or scroll down in the page for a list of those likely to be of particular relevance to those concerned with the conservation and use of agrobiodiversity.

The list is certainly not complete so please let us know if there are other events you want to let PAR website readers know by making a comment to this post or sending us an email at platformcoordinatorAT cgiar.org.

Monday, 8 October 2012, Lunch-Time

13:15 – 14:45

Side Event Room 4 – HITEX 1 – Ground Level

INTERNATIONAL INDIGENOUS FORUM ON BIODIVERSITY

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AND THE CONVENTION ON BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY The International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity (IIFB) will share perspectives from each of the regions specifically regarding traditional knowledge and the sustainable use of biodiversity.

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.06 – Level 1

DIVERSITAS – INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMME OF BIODIVERSITY SCIENCE (LEAD ORGANISER); SCBD – CONVENTION ON BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY SECRETARIAT; GEO BON – GLOBAL EARTH OBSERVATION BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK; IHDP – INTERNATIONAL HUMAN DIMENSIONS ON GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH

BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES SCIENCE AND OBSERVATION FOR A BIODIVERSE FUTURE EARTH: CONTRIBUTION OF RESEARCH TO THE AICHI TARGETS Evidence is growing that human well-being depends on multiple services provided by ecosystems, many of which being underpinned by biodiversity, which continues to be lost at an unprecedented rate. In response to this accelerating loss of biodiversity as well as to changes in the biodiversity science-policy landscape (establishment of a Biodiversity Observing Network — GEO BON; of an Intergovernmental science-policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services — IPBES; of the new Future Earth initiative; and release of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011–2020), DIVERSITAS released a strategic vision presenting scientific challenges for the next decade of research on biodiversity and ecosystem services: ‘‘Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services Science for a Sustainable Planet’’. This side event will present these scientific challenges, observation needs to achieve these challenges, and how they will contribute to the implementation of the CBD Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011–2020 and the Aichi targets. It will also draw some recommendations for the development of the sustainable development goals to contribute to a more sustainable and equitable biodiverse future Earth.

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.08 – Level 1

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY

FINANCING THE STEWARDSHIP OF GLOBAL BIODIVERSITY: GEF SUPPORT TO ACHIEVING THE AICHI TARGETS
GEF
Secretariat will provide an overview of: 1) the GEF-5 biodiversity strategy; 2) programming of resources during the first two years of GEF-5; and 3) how this support is contributing to the achievement of the Aichi Targets.

Tuesday, 9 October 2012, Lunch-Time

13:15 – 14:45

Side Event Room 1 – HITEX 1 – Ground Level

ASOCIACIÓN ANDES AND SENECA INTERNATIONAL

INDIGENOUS ECONOMIES, BIODIVERSITY, AND FOOD SOVEREIGNTY This workshop will discuss the interaction between agrobiobiodiversity, food sovereignty and Indigenous economies in the context of cross-sectoral topics related to seed management, food security and sustainable agriculture. Special attention will be given to biocultural approaches to the conservation of agro-biodiversity, the sustainable use of its components, and the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the use of genetic resources.

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.06 – Level 1

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY

IMPLEMENTING THE NAGOYA PROTOCOL ON ABS: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES.
Opportunities for GEF financial and technical assistance in support of the implementation of the Nagoya Protocol will be presented along with experiences and challenges of implementing the Nagoya Protocol and ABS regimes in selected countries.

Tuesday, 9 October 2012, Evening

18:15 – 19:45

Side Event Room 2 – HITEX 1 – Ground Level

M S SWAMINATHAN RESEARCH FOUNDATION

CONSERVATION AND ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT OF GLOBALLY IMPORTANT AGRICULTURAL HERITAGE SYSTEMS (GIAHS) Worldwide, specific agricultural systems and landscapes have been created, shaped and maintained by generations of farmers and herders based on diverse natural resources, using locally adapted management practices. Building on local knowledge and experience, these ingenious agri-cultural systems reflect the evolution of humankind, the diversity of its knowledge, and its profound relationship with nature. These systems have resulted not only in outstanding landscapes, maintenance and adaptation of globally significant agricultural biodiversity, indigenous knowledge systems and resilient ecosystems, but, above all, in the sustained provision of multiple goods and services, food and livelihood security and quality of life. In order to safeguard and support world’s agri-cultural heritage systems in 2002 FAO started an initiative for the conservation and adaptive management of Globally Important Agricultural Heritage systems (GIAHS). The initiative aims to establish the basis for international recognition, dynamic conservation and adaptive management of Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS) and their agricultural biodiversity, knowledge systems, food and livelihood security and cultures throughout the world. The GIAHS initiative has identified pilot sites in Peru, Chile, China, Philippines, Tunisia, Algeria, Kenya and Tanzania. In these pilot systems dynamic conservation management approaches will be developed and implemented, to assist national and local stakeholders in the conservation and adaptive management of the systems. Recently, two GIAHS sites have been identified and launched in India. One represents the traditional agriculture system of Koraput and the other one is represented by the Below Sea Level Farming System in Kuttanad region. This side event in partnership with the FAO will highlight the importance of these systems for enhancing livelihood and ecological security, based on the sustainable management of the bioresources of these regions giving concurrent attention to the local traditional knowledge systems.

18:15 – 19:45

HALL II – Ground Level

REGIONAL CENTRE NATIONAL AFFORESTATION AND ECO-DEVELOPMENT BOARD, NORTH EAST HILL UNIVERSITY, IORA ECOLOGICAL SOLUTIONS

BIOLOGICAL AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN NORTH EAST INDIA Regional Centre National Afforestation and Eco-Development Board (RCNAEB), North East Hill University (NEHU) and Iora Ecological Solutions intend to invite leading conservation and development professional, members of indigenous, tribal, and local communities, representatives of governmental and non-governmental organizations, U.N. agencies, universities and research institutions, funding organizations, educators, students to engage them in a cross disciplinary dialogue to achieve the following objectives: 1.How biological and cultural diversity are interrelated and how they can be managed in an integrated manner; 2.Identify how this linkage fits in with the mandate of the CBD and its protocols/ targets; 3.Develop methodology and metrics to study and assess this linkage and the effectiveness of integrated management; 4.Case studies of biological and cultural diversity interdependence from North East India; 5.Develop future action plan/ project ideas to test out this hypothesis and develop methodological framework further Some of the important issues that are expected to be discussed include the forestry management regime in the North East, particularly the Sacred Groves and community owned forests and how conservation of cultural and biological diversity can be integrated. The event is already approved for support by the National Biodiversity Authority, Government of India.

Wednesday, 10 October 2012 Morning

Satellite event at National Institute of Nutrition in Hyderabad

10:00 – 11:00

MSSRF

Biodiversity Conservation for Alleviating Poverty and Malnutrition”.

Wednesday, 10 October 2012, Lunch-Time

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.09 – Level 1

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

PROMOTING DIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL PRODUCTION LANDSCAPES In this workshop the speakers from different parts of the world will share their experiences on promoting biodiversity and ecosystem services while enhancing local livelihood in socio-ecological production landscapes. The presentations will be followed by a discussion related to landscape governance, ecosystem services and assessment, including: “How can good governance contribute to increasing social and ecological resilience in a landscape? How do we assess the trend and status of the ecosystem services in a socio-ecological production landscape?.

Wednesday, 10 October 2012, Evening

18:15 – 19:45

Side Event Room 1 – HITEX 1 – Ground Level

UNESCO / SECRETARIAT OF THE CONVENTION ON BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY

JOIN PROGRAMME WITH UNESCO The side event will focus on the joint programme between UNESCO and the SCBD, as developed at the International Conference on Biological and Cultural Diversity for Development (June 2010, Montreal). The event will provide an update an initial progress & step forward.

18:15 – 19:45

Room 2.01 – Level 2

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ BIOCULTURAL CLIMATE CHANGE ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE

BIOCULTURAL APPROACHES TO COMMUNITY BASED ADAPTATION AND MITIGATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE This workshop will discuss the experiences of the Indigenous Peoples’ Biocultural Climate Change Assessment initiative in developing community-based biodiversity and climate change assessments to create local mitigation and adaptation responses in the context of food security and livelihoods, with special attention to the interaction between climate, land use, and Indigenous territoriality.

Thursday 11 October 2012 – Lunch time

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.02 – Level 1

CENTRE FOR SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

MODERN AGRICULTURE AND EROSION OF BIODIVERSITY The rapid depletion of agrodiversity with Green Revolution has become much more severe after the advent of Genetic Engineering. India which is a home of cotton lost all its desi cotton varieties as they got relaced by inter specific and intra specific hybrids. After the release of Bt cotton, all the cotton varieties and hybrids got replaced with Bt cotton hybrids with only two or three genetic backgrounds. Given this situation, the other crops native to India like Rice, Brinjal, Pulses, castor and several others in which Genetic Engineering is being attempted will have a serious impact on the diversity of the crops. The event will focus on bringing focus on the impact of modern agriculture on eroding biodiversity and impacting livelihoods.

13:15 – 14:45

HALL III – Ground Level

UNEP, UNESCO, FAO, UNDP, AND GOVERNMENT OF GERMANY

IPBES – FROM ESTABLISHMENT TO OPERATIONALIZATION
IPBES,
the Integovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, was established in April 2012. However, there is much work to be done for the Platform to be operational. This event will update on the work underway to operationalize IPBES, including on the interessional work in preparation for the first IPBES Plenary meeting to be held early in 2013.

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.08 – Level 1

BUNDESAMT FÜR NATURSCHUTZ

BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES BENEFITS OF CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION AND ADAPTATION PROJECTS Climate change mitigation and adaptation projects can potentially deliver benefits for biodiversity and ecosystem services. However, in some instances, for example, where afforestation leads to the establishment of monocultures or the introduction of exogenous trees, climate projects may have negative impacts on biodiversity. Neglecting the potential of biodiversity to increase ecosystem stability and to support sustainability can counteract the broader objectives and the effectiveness of climate change mitigation and adaptation projects. Jointly organised by BfN, UNEP-WCMC and Birdlife International this side-event will provide a forum for discussions on approaches to better integrate biodiversity into climate change mitigation and adaptation projects, as well as the relationship between project evaluation and selection criteria, and related objectives of the CBD and UNFCCC. Specifically it will present, and collect feedback on, draft criteria that have been developed for the International Climate Initiative (ICI) funded by Germany´s Federal Ministry for the Environment (BMU) to select and evaluate climate change projects that minimise harm to biodiversity and ecosystem services and maximise benefits

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.10 – Level 1

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY

RESOURCE MOBILIZATION FOR BIODIVERSITY PROJECTS: CASE OF GEF PROJECTS IN INDIA This side event will be jointly hosted by the GEF operational focal point at the Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India and the Global Environment Facility Secretariat. The side event will introduce how incremental financial resources has been mobilized in India for biodiversity conservation, with particular focus on GEF finance. The side event will also highlight some of the key GEF projects in India, including the Eco-development, marine and coastal, and agro-biodiversity projects. The event will also discuss future resource mobilization for biodiversity project financing in India

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.01 – Level 1

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT JAPAN, UNU-IAS (IPSI SECRETARIAT) ORGANIZATION

ACHIEVEMENTS AND FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OF THE INTERNATIONAL PARTNERSHIP FOR THE SATOYAMA INITIATIVE (IPSI) As of August 1, the International Partnership for the Satoyama Initiative (IPSI) comprises 117 various members working on maintaining and rebuilding socio-ecological production landscapes around the world. At this event, some IPSI members will give some presentations to share the outcome of the IPSI.

18:15 – 19:45

Room 1.07 – Level 1

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR INTEGRATED MOUNTAIN DEVELOPMENT IN COLLABORATION WITH WWF INDIA

HIGH ALTITUDE WETLANDS OF THE HINDU KUSH HIMALAYAS FOR PEOPLE & BIODIVERSITY During the side event, the International Center for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) in collaboration with WWF – India aims to bring together the national and regional experts working on high altitude wetlands. The purpose of the side event is to: 1. Share experiences and lessons learnt on managing High Altitude Wetlands of the Hindu Kush Himalayan regionand to raise awareness among the international and regional communities about these unique and very productive ecosystems. 2. Identify the prospects of High Altitude Wetlands as potential repositories of unique and rare biodiversity and their role in climate regulation for enhancing ecological and socio-economic resilience. 3. Collect and bring out highlights of various High Altitude Wetlands initiatives from the Hindu Kush Himalayas and lessons learnt in the form of a publication for wider sharing and use by the national, regional and global communities.

Thursday 11 October 2012 – Evening

18:15 – 19:45

Room 1.08 – Level 1

BOTANIC GARDENS CONSERVATION INTERNATIONAL, GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP FOR PLANT CONSERVATION (GPPC) AND CBD SECRETARIAT

THE GLOBAL STRATEGY FOR PLANT CONSERVATION – BUILDING CAPACITY TO SUPPORT NATIONAL IMPLEMENTATION This side event will highlight the on-line toolkit developed to support national and regional implementation of the GSPC. The toolkit is available in the 6 UN languages and the various language versions will be demonstrated. The side event will also discuss the linkages betwen the GSPC targets and the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity and capacity building activities in support of this.

18:15 – 19:45

HALL I – Ground Level

SCIENCE FOR EQUITY, EMPOWERMENT AND DEVELOPMENT (SEED), DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (DST)

INTEGRATING CONSERVATION AND LIVELIHOODS AROUND PROTECTED AREAS THROUGH SCALABLE TECHNOLOGICAL SOLUTIONS WWF-India with support from SEED launched a project in 2007 on “People and Protected Areas:Conservation and Sustainable Livelihoods in Partnership with Local Communities” to coordinate and support the efforts of local and grassroots VOs promoting innovative mechanisms to enhance local livelihoods for communities living in and around Protected Areas (PAs). The first phase of the project (2008-2011) covered 12 VOs at 13 different PAs in diverse ecological areas of our country.This programme has been unique and successful in developing diverse and sustainable livelihood models and enabling adoption of better conservation practices for sustainable use of forest resources through introduction and application of need based appropriate technologies for capacity building at the local level. The successful technology based field models linking conservation and livelihoods around PAs that were established under the project have the potential for wider replication and adoption at the local as well as global level. It is thus important to share the success stories obtained from the 1st phase of the programme with the larger world and the side events being organized at the upcoming CoP11 offers an excellent platform for the same –showing role of technology to address conservation vis-à-vis livelihood issues at the global level.

18:15 – 19:45

Room 1.06 – Level 1

IUCN, THE INTERNATIONAL UNION FOR CONSERVATION OF NATURE

CONSERVING DRYLAND BIODIVERSITY: SUPPORTING THE ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES OF MOBILE PASTORALISTS AND OTHER INDIGENOUS PEOPLES Discussion of the recommendations from the recent IUCN-UNCCD-UNEP/WCMC publication “Conserving Dryland Biodiversity”. Dryland Biodiversity is globally and locally valued, but some dryland subtypes are poorly represented in terms of protected area coverage. However, indigenous and local communities conserve large areas of drylands through indigenous practices that at the same time are the basis of resilient livelihoods and sustainable development. With appropriate support dryland communities can significantly contribute to reaching, and even surpassing the Aichi targets. This event will present global analysis combined with local experiences from the region, including Indian pastoralists and Civil Society.

18:15 – 19:45

Room 1.07 – Level 1

UNCTAD

HOW DEVELOPING VALUE CHAINS AND SUSTAINABLE TRADE INITIATIVES CONTRIBUTE TO THE SP/AICHI TARGET AND THE POST-RIO+20 PROCESS This event will present the tools, experiencies and lessons learned that are developed to promote trade & value chains using native biodiversity in developing countries. It will also present the discussions and results of the First BioTrade Congress named “Biodiversity: the Life of the Green Economy” (http://r0.unctad.org/biotrade/congress/event.htm)

Friday, 12 October 2012, Lunch-Time

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.01 – Level 1

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR INTEGRATED MOUNTAIN DEVELOPMENT IN COLLABORATION WITH G.B. PANT INSTITUTE OF HIMALAYAN ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT AND OTHER PARTNERS

MANAGING BIODIVERSITY IN TRANS-BOUNDARY LANDSCAPE IN THE HINDU KUSH-HIMALAYA REGION During the side event, the International Center for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) in collaboration with the G.B. Pant Institute of Himalayan Environment and Development (GBPIHD) and other prominent partners in the Hindu Kush Himalaya region aim to invite the regional and global experts working on biodiversity conservation and management at trans-boundary landscape. The purpose of the side event is to: – Share experiences and lessons learnt on managing biodiversity with ‘Ecosystem Approach’ in the trans-boundary landscapes in the HKH region viz: Kanchenjunga, Kailash, Brahmaputra-Salween, and Karakoram-Pamir; – Raise awareness among the international and regional communities about the prospect of regional cooperation in advocating ‘Ecosystem Approach’ at landscape level for enhancing ecological and socio-economic resilience; and – Collect and bring out highlights of each trans-boundary initiatives and lesson learnt in a form of publication for wider sharing and use by the national, regional and global communities.

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.05 – Level 1

DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FÜR INTERNATIONALE ZUSAMMENARBEIT (GIZ) GMBH

CONSERVING BIODIVERSITY HERITAGE SITES FOR CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION: ROLE OF YOUTH IN LINKING CULTURAL PRACTICES AND FUTURE STRATEGIES The sacred sites and the associated traditional knowledge may become indispensable when the communities try to find sustainable solutions for adapting to climate change. One of the most important stakeholder group in this process is the youth, who will witness the results of the present efforts. The event aims at: – highlighting the potential of traditionally conserved sacred sites as reservoirs of opportunities towards climate change adaptation, sustainable livelihoods for rural poor as well as preserving the biodiversity heritage of the country/ region, and -understanding the perception of youth in maintaining the sacred sites and the possible role they can play in the overall institutional framework. This side-event will be organized in the form of a “Panel Discussion” to provide a platform to discuss the reasons and benefits of conserving the sacred sites, their potential as a climate change adaptation tool and the role that youth can play in maintaining this rich biodiversity heritage. The event will also showcase the example of the sacred sites of the North Eastern Region of India- A Global Biodiversity Hotspot.

Saturday, 13 October all day 

International Conference Centre

CBD SECRETARIAT

20/20 Talks: 20 Presentations on 20 Targets

Short presentations on each of the 20 Aichi Biodiversity Targets. The PAR Coordinator will introduce Target 13 (By 2020, the genetic diversity of cultivated plants and farmed and domesticated animals and of wild relatives, including other socio-economically as well as culturally valuable species, is maintained, and strategies have been developed and implemented for minimizing genetic erosion and safeguarding their genetic diversity)

Monday, 15 October 2012, Lunch-Time

13:15 – 14:45

Side Event Room 2 – HITEX 1 – Ground Level

DECCAN DEVELOPMENT SOCIETY

AFRO ASIAN FOOD SOVEREIGNTY: CAN MILLETS BE THE BONDING CROPS? An international meeting comprising of farmers and pastoralists from Western Africa, South Asia and South-East Asia to discuss the global challenges and threats facing indigenous knowledge systems and traditional farming and pastoralist communities, and the tools that can be employed in order to face these challenges.

13:15 – 14:45

Room 2.01 – Level 2

UNEP/FAO

STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2020 – SUSTAINABLE USE OF AGRICULTURAL BIODIVERSITY Countries will present case studies on sustainable use of components of agricultural biodiversity will be presented. UNEP and FAO

Facilitated by PAR

Monday, 15 October 2012, Afternoon

15.30

Rio Conventions Pavilion

UNCCD/IFOAM

LAND DAY 6:  LAND DEGRADATION NEUTRALITY  -  A RESPONSE TO THE 2020 AICHI TARGETS

Tuesday, 16 October 2012, Evening

18:15 – 19:45

HALL I – Ground Level

LA VIA CAMPESINA

PEASANT SEEDS AND AGROECOLOGY: FOOD SOVEREIGNTY IN THE PRACTICE Key solutions to help countries and rural communities adapt to a changing climate in the midst of nutritional and financial crises.

Thursday, 18 October 2012, Evening

18:15 – 19:45

Room 2.01 – Level 2

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION

GLOBALLY IMPORTANT AGRICULTURAL HERITAGE SYSTEMS (GIAHS): A LEGACY FOR THE FUTURE! The Food and Agriculture Organization recognizes the enormous contributions and important role of family farmers, indigenous peoples and local communities in managing, conserving and sustaining our biodiversity. Ten years after its initiation by FAO in 2002, during the World Summit on Sustainable Development, the Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems Initiative (GIAHS) represents a sophisticated framework for the recognition, dynamic conservation of remarkable systems of agriculture with their agricultural biodiversity, associated biodiversity, knowledge systems, cultures and landscapes, to achieve food security nutrition and livelihoods. GIAHS Initiative emphasizes balance between conservation, adaptation and socio-economic development – sustaining agriculture development while maintaining the harmony between nature and people. The side event is aimed to showcase humanity’s agricultural heritage systems and the fundamental role of family farmers, indigenous and local communities in addressing the Aichi targets and to support the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020.

 

 

Monday, 8 October 2012, Lunch-Time

13:15 – 14:45

Side Event Room 4 – HITEX 1 – Ground Level

INTERNATIONAL INDIGENOUS FORUM ON BIODIVERSITY

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AND THE CONVENTION ON BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY The International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity (IIFB) will share perspectives from each of the regions specifically regarding traditional knowledge and the sustainable use of biodiversity.

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.06 – Level 1

DIVERSITAS – INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMME OF BIODIVERSITY SCIENCE (LEAD ORGANISER); SCBD – CONVENTION ON BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY SECRETARIAT; GEO BON – GLOBAL EARTH OBSERVATION BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK; IHDP – INTERNATIONAL HUMAN DIMENSIONS ON GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH

BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES SCIENCE AND OBSERVATION FOR A BIODIVERSE FUTURE EARTH: CONTRIBUTION OF RESEARCH TO THE AICHI TARGETS Evidence is growing that human well-being depends on multiple services provided by ecosystems, many of which being underpinned by biodiversity, which continues to be lost at an unprecedented rate. In response to this accelerating loss of biodiversity as well as to changes in the biodiversity science-policy landscape (establishment of a Biodiversity Observing Network — GEO BON; of an Intergovernmental science-policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services — IPBES; of the new Future Earth initiative; and release of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011–2020), DIVERSITAS released a strategic vision presenting scientific challenges for the next decade of research on biodiversity and ecosystem services: ‘‘Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services Science for a Sustainable Planet’’. This side event will present these scientific challenges, observation needs to achieve these challenges, and how they will contribute to the implementation of the CBD Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011–2020 and the Aichi targets. It will also draw some recommendations for the development of the sustainable development goals to contribute to a more sustainable and equitable biodiverse future Earth.

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.08 – Level 1

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY

FINANCING THE STEWARDSHIP OF GLOBAL BIODIVERSITY: GEF SUPPORT TO ACHIEVING THE AICHI TARGETS
GEF
Secretariat will provide an overview of: 1) the GEF-5 biodiversity strategy; 2) programming of resources during the first two years of GEF-5; and 3) how this support is contributing to the achievement of the Aichi Targets.

Tuesday, 9 October 2012, Lunch-Time

13:15 – 14:45

Side Event Room 1 – HITEX 1 – Ground Level

ASOCIACIÓN ANDES AND SENECA INTERNATIONAL

INDIGENOUS ECONOMIES, BIODIVERSITY, AND FOOD SOVEREIGNTY This workshop will discuss the interaction between agrobiobiodiversity, food sovereignty and Indigenous economies in the context of cross-sectoral topics related to seed management, food security and sustainable agriculture. Special attention will be given to biocultural approaches to the conservation of agro-biodiversity, the sustainable use of its components, and the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the use of genetic resources.

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.06 – Level 1

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY

IMPLEMENTING THE NAGOYA PROTOCOL ON ABS: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES.
Opportunities for GEF financial and technical assistance in support of the implementation of the Nagoya Protocol will be presented along with experiences and challenges of implementing the Nagoya Protocol and ABS regimes in selected countries.

Tuesday, 9 October 2012, Evening

18:15 – 19:45

Side Event Room 2 – HITEX 1 – Ground Level

M S SWAMINATHAN RESEARCH FOUNDATION

CONSERVATION AND ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT OF GLOBALLY IMPORTANT AGRICULTURAL HERITAGE SYSTEMS (GIAHS) Worldwide, specific agricultural systems and landscapes have been created, shaped and maintained by generations of farmers and herders based on diverse natural resources, using locally adapted management practices. Building on local knowledge and experience, these ingenious agri-cultural systems reflect the evolution of humankind, the diversity of its knowledge, and its profound relationship with nature. These systems have resulted not only in outstanding landscapes, maintenance and adaptation of globally significant agricultural biodiversity, indigenous knowledge systems and resilient ecosystems, but, above all, in the sustained provision of multiple goods and services, food and livelihood security and quality of life. In order to safeguard and support world’s agri-cultural heritage systems in 2002 FAO started an initiative for the conservation and adaptive management of Globally Important Agricultural Heritage systems (GIAHS). The initiative aims to establish the basis for international recognition, dynamic conservation and adaptive management of Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS) and their agricultural biodiversity, knowledge systems, food and livelihood security and cultures throughout the world. The GIAHS initiative has identified pilot sites in Peru, Chile, China, Philippines, Tunisia, Algeria, Kenya and Tanzania. In these pilot systems dynamic conservation management approaches will be developed and implemented, to assist national and local stakeholders in the conservation and adaptive management of the systems. Recently, two GIAHS sites have been identified and launched in India. One represents the traditional agriculture system of Koraput and the other one is represented by the Below Sea Level Farming System in Kuttanad region. This side event in partnership with the FAO will highlight the importance of these systems for enhancing livelihood and ecological security, based on the sustainable management of the bioresources of these regions giving concurrent attention to the local traditional knowledge systems.

18:15 – 19:45

HALL II – Ground Level

REGIONAL CENTRE NATIONAL AFFORESTATION AND ECO-DEVELOPMENT BOARD, NORTH EAST HILL UNIVERSITY, IORA ECOLOGICAL SOLUTIONS

BIOLOGICAL AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN NORTH EAST INDIA Regional Centre National Afforestation and Eco-Development Board (RCNAEB), North East Hill University (NEHU) and Iora Ecological Solutions intend to invite leading conservation and development professional, members of indigenous, tribal, and local communities, representatives of governmental and non-governmental organizations, U.N. agencies, universities and research institutions, funding organizations, educators, students to engage them in a cross disciplinary dialogue to achieve the following objectives: 1.How biological and cultural diversity are interrelated and how they can be managed in an integrated manner; 2.Identify how this linkage fits in with the mandate of the CBD and its protocols/ targets; 3.Develop methodology and metrics to study and assess this linkage and the effectiveness of integrated management; 4.Case studies of biological and cultural diversity interdependence from North East India; 5.Develop future action plan/ project ideas to test out this hypothesis and develop methodological framework further Some of the important issues that are expected to be discussed include the forestry management regime in the North East, particularly the Sacred Groves and community owned forests and how conservation of cultural and biological diversity can be integrated. The event is already approved for support by the National Biodiversity Authority, Government of India.

Wednesday, 10 October 2012 Morning

Satellite event at National Institute of Nutrition in Hyderabad

10:00 – 11:00

MSSRF

Biodiversity Conservation for Alleviating Poverty and Malnutrition”.

Wednesday, 10 October 2012, Lunch-Time

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.09 – Level 1

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

PROMOTING DIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL PRODUCTION LANDSCAPES In this workshop the speakers from different parts of the world will share their experiences on promoting biodiversity and ecosystem services while enhancing local livelihood in socio-ecological production landscapes. The presentations will be followed by a discussion related to landscape governance, ecosystem services and assessment, including: “How can good governance contribute to increasing social and ecological resilience in a landscape? How do we assess the trend and status of the ecosystem services in a socio-ecological production landscape?.

Wednesday, 10 October 2012, Evening

18:15 – 19:45

Side Event Room 1 – HITEX 1 – Ground Level

UNESCO / SECRETARIAT OF THE CONVENTION ON BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY

JOIN PROGRAMME WITH UNESCO The side event will focus on the joint programme between UNESCO and the SCBD, as developed at the International Conference on Biological and Cultural Diversity for Development (June 2010, Montreal). The event will provide an update an initial progress & step forward.

18:15 – 19:45

Room 2.01 – Level 2

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ BIOCULTURAL CLIMATE CHANGE ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE

BIOCULTURAL APPROACHES TO COMMUNITY BASED ADAPTATION AND MITIGATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE This workshop will discuss the experiences of the Indigenous Peoples’ Biocultural Climate Change Assessment initiative in developing community-based biodiversity and climate change assessments to create local mitigation and adaptation responses in the context of food security and livelihoods, with special attention to the interaction between climate, land use, and Indigenous territoriality.

Thursday 11 October 2012 – Lunch time

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.02 – Level 1

CENTRE FOR SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

MODERN AGRICULTURE AND EROSION OF BIODIVERSITY The rapid depletion of agrodiversity with Green Revolution has become much more severe after the advent of Genetic Engineering. India which is a home of cotton lost all its desi cotton varieties as they got relaced by inter specific and intra specific hybrids. After the release of Bt cotton, all the cotton varieties and hybrids got replaced with Bt cotton hybrids with only two or three genetic backgrounds. Given this situation, the other crops native to India like Rice, Brinjal, Pulses, castor and several others in which Genetic Engineering is being attempted will have a serious impact on the diversity of the crops. The event will focus on bringing focus on the impact of modern agriculture on eroding biodiversity and impacting livelihoods.

13:15 – 14:45

HALL III – Ground Level

UNEP, UNESCO, FAO, UNDP, AND GOVERNMENT OF GERMANY

IPBES – FROM ESTABLISHMENT TO OPERATIONALIZATION
IPBES,
the Integovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, was established in April 2012. However, there is much work to be done for the Platform to be operational. This event will update on the work underway to operationalize IPBES, including on the interessional work in preparation for the first IPBES Plenary meeting to be held early in 2013.

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.08 – Level 1

BUNDESAMT FÜR NATURSCHUTZ

BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES BENEFITS OF CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION AND ADAPTATION PROJECTS Climate change mitigation and adaptation projects can potentially deliver benefits for biodiversity and ecosystem services. However, in some instances, for example, where afforestation leads to the establishment of monocultures or the introduction of exogenous trees, climate projects may have negative impacts on biodiversity. Neglecting the potential of biodiversity to increase ecosystem stability and to support sustainability can counteract the broader objectives and the effectiveness of climate change mitigation and adaptation projects. Jointly organised by BfN, UNEP-WCMC and Birdlife International this side-event will provide a forum for discussions on approaches to better integrate biodiversity into climate change mitigation and adaptation projects, as well as the relationship between project evaluation and selection criteria, and related objectives of the CBD and UNFCCC. Specifically it will present, and collect feedback on, draft criteria that have been developed for the International Climate Initiative (ICI) funded by Germany´s Federal Ministry for the Environment (BMU) to select and evaluate climate change projects that minimise harm to biodiversity and ecosystem services and maximise benefits

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.10 – Level 1

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY

RESOURCE MOBILIZATION FOR BIODIVERSITY PROJECTS: CASE OF GEF PROJECTS IN INDIA This side event will be jointly hosted by the GEF operational focal point at the Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India and the Global Environment Facility Secretariat. The side event will introduce how incremental financial resources has been mobilized in India for biodiversity conservation, with particular focus on GEF finance. The side event will also highlight some of the key GEF projects in India, including the Eco-development, marine and coastal, and agro-biodiversity projects. The event will also discuss future resource mobilization for biodiversity project financing in India

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.01 – Level 1

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT JAPAN, UNU-IAS (IPSI SECRETARIAT) ORGANIZATION

ACHIEVEMENTS AND FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OF THE INTERNATIONAL PARTNERSHIP FOR THE SATOYAMA INITIATIVE (IPSI) As of August 1, the International Partnership for the Satoyama Initiative (IPSI) comprises 117 various members working on maintaining and rebuilding socio-ecological production landscapes around the world. At this event, some IPSI members will give some presentations to share the outcome of the IPSI.

18:15 – 19:45

Room 1.07 – Level 1

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR INTEGRATED MOUNTAIN DEVELOPMENT IN COLLABORATION WITH WWF INDIA

HIGH ALTITUDE WETLANDS OF THE HINDU KUSH HIMALAYAS FOR PEOPLE & BIODIVERSITY During the side event, the International Center for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) in collaboration with WWF – India aims to bring together the national and regional experts working on high altitude wetlands. The purpose of the side event is to: 1. Share experiences and lessons learnt on managing High Altitude Wetlands of the Hindu Kush Himalayan regionand to raise awareness among the international and regional communities about these unique and very productive ecosystems. 2. Identify the prospects of High Altitude Wetlands as potential repositories of unique and rare biodiversity and their role in climate regulation for enhancing ecological and socio-economic resilience. 3. Collect and bring out highlights of various High Altitude Wetlands initiatives from the Hindu Kush Himalayas and lessons learnt in the form of a publication for wider sharing and use by the national, regional and global communities.

Thursday 11 October 2012 – Evening

18:15 – 19:45

Room 1.08 – Level 1

BOTANIC GARDENS CONSERVATION INTERNATIONAL, GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP FOR PLANT CONSERVATION (GPPC) AND CBD SECRETARIAT

THE GLOBAL STRATEGY FOR PLANT CONSERVATION – BUILDING CAPACITY TO SUPPORT NATIONAL IMPLEMENTATION This side event will highlight the on-line toolkit developed to support national and regional implementation of the GSPC. The toolkit is available in the 6 UN languages and the various language versions will be demonstrated. The side event will also discuss the linkages betwen the GSPC targets and the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity and capacity building activities in support of this.

18:15 – 19:45

HALL I – Ground Level

SCIENCE FOR EQUITY, EMPOWERMENT AND DEVELOPMENT (SEED), DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (DST)

INTEGRATING CONSERVATION AND LIVELIHOODS AROUND PROTECTED AREAS THROUGH SCALABLE TECHNOLOGICAL SOLUTIONS WWF-India with support from SEED launched a project in 2007 on “People and Protected Areas:Conservation and Sustainable Livelihoods in Partnership with Local Communities” to coordinate and support the efforts of local and grassroots VOs promoting innovative mechanisms to enhance local livelihoods for communities living in and around Protected Areas (PAs). The first phase of the project (2008-2011) covered 12 VOs at 13 different PAs in diverse ecological areas of our country.This programme has been unique and successful in developing diverse and sustainable livelihood models and enabling adoption of better conservation practices for sustainable use of forest resources through introduction and application of need based appropriate technologies for capacity building at the local level. The successful technology based field models linking conservation and livelihoods around PAs that were established under the project have the potential for wider replication and adoption at the local as well as global level. It is thus important to share the success stories obtained from the 1st phase of the programme with the larger world and the side events being organized at the upcoming CoP11 offers an excellent platform for the same –showing role of technology to address conservation vis-à-vis livelihood issues at the global level.

18:15 – 19:45

Room 1.06 – Level 1

IUCN, THE INTERNATIONAL UNION FOR CONSERVATION OF NATURE

CONSERVING DRYLAND BIODIVERSITY: SUPPORTING THE ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES OF MOBILE PASTORALISTS AND OTHER INDIGENOUS PEOPLES Discussion of the recommendations from the recent IUCN-UNCCD-UNEP/WCMC publication “Conserving Dryland Biodiversity”. Dryland Biodiversity is globally and locally valued, but some dryland subtypes are poorly represented in terms of protected area coverage. However, indigenous and local communities conserve large areas of drylands through indigenous practices that at the same time are the basis of resilient livelihoods and sustainable development. With appropriate support dryland communities can significantly contribute to reaching, and even surpassing the Aichi targets. This event will present global analysis combined with local experiences from the region, including Indian pastoralists and Civil Society.

18:15 – 19:45

Room 1.07 – Level 1

UNCTAD

HOW DEVELOPING VALUE CHAINS AND SUSTAINABLE TRADE INITIATIVES CONTRIBUTE TO THE SP/AICHI TARGET AND THE POST-RIO+20 PROCESS This event will present the tools, experiencies and lessons learned that are developed to promote trade & value chains using native biodiversity in developing countries. It will also present the discussions and results of the First BioTrade Congress named “Biodiversity: the Life of the Green Economy” (http://r0.unctad.org/biotrade/congress/event.htm)

Friday, 12 October 2012, Lunch-Time

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.01 – Level 1

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR INTEGRATED MOUNTAIN DEVELOPMENT IN COLLABORATION WITH G.B. PANT INSTITUTE OF HIMALAYAN ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT AND OTHER PARTNERS

MANAGING BIODIVERSITY IN TRANS-BOUNDARY LANDSCAPE IN THE HINDU KUSH-HIMALAYA REGION During the side event, the International Center for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) in collaboration with the G.B. Pant Institute of Himalayan Environment and Development (GBPIHD) and other prominent partners in the Hindu Kush Himalaya region aim to invite the regional and global experts working on biodiversity conservation and management at trans-boundary landscape. The purpose of the side event is to: – Share experiences and lessons learnt on managing biodiversity with ‘Ecosystem Approach’ in the trans-boundary landscapes in the HKH region viz: Kanchenjunga, Kailash, Brahmaputra-Salween, and Karakoram-Pamir; – Raise awareness among the international and regional communities about the prospect of regional cooperation in advocating ‘Ecosystem Approach’ at landscape level for enhancing ecological and socio-economic resilience; and – Collect and bring out highlights of each trans-boundary initiatives and lesson learnt in a form of publication for wider sharing and use by the national, regional and global communities.

13:15 – 14:45

Room 1.05 – Level 1

DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FÜR INTERNATIONALE ZUSAMMENARBEIT (GIZ) GMBH

CONSERVING BIODIVERSITY HERITAGE SITES FOR CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION: ROLE OF YOUTH IN LINKING CULTURAL PRACTICES AND FUTURE STRATEGIES The sacred sites and the associated traditional knowledge may become indispensable when the communities try to find sustainable solutions for adapting to climate change. One of the most important stakeholder group in this process is the youth, who will witness the results of the present efforts. The event aims at: – highlighting the potential of traditionally conserved sacred sites as reservoirs of opportunities towards climate change adaptation, sustainable livelihoods for rural poor as well as preserving the biodiversity heritage of the country/ region, and -understanding the perception of youth in maintaining the sacred sites and the possible role they can play in the overall institutional framework. This side-event will be organized in the form of a “Panel Discussion” to provide a platform to discuss the reasons and benefits of conserving the sacred sites, their potential as a climate change adaptation tool and the role that youth can play in maintaining this rich biodiversity heritage. The event will also showcase the example of the sacred sites of the North Eastern Region of India- A Global Biodiversity Hotspot.

Saturday, 13 October all day 

International Conference Centre

CBD SECRETARIAT

20/20 Talks: 20 Presentations on 20 Targets

Short presentations on each of the 20 Aichi Biodiversity Targets. The PAR Coordinator will introduce Target 13 (By 2020, the genetic diversity of cultivated plants and farmed and domesticated animals and of wild relatives, including other socio-economically as well as culturally valuable species, is maintained, and strategies have been developed and implemented for minimizing genetic erosion and safeguarding their genetic diversity)

Monday, 15 October 2012, Lunch-Time

13:15 – 14:45

Side Event Room 2 – HITEX 1 – Ground Level

DECCAN DEVELOPMENT SOCIETY

AFRO ASIAN FOOD SOVEREIGNTY: CAN MILLETS BE THE BONDING CROPS? An international meeting comprising of farmers and pastoralists from Western Africa, South Asia and South-East Asia to discuss the global challenges and threats facing indigenous knowledge systems and traditional farming and pastoralist communities, and the tools that can be employed in order to face these challenges.

13:15 – 14:45

Room 2.01 – Level 2

UNEP/FAO

STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2020 – SUSTAINABLE USE OF AGRICULTURAL BIODIVERSITY Countries will present case studies on sustainable use of components of agricultural biodiversity will be presented. UNEP and FAO

Facilitated by PAR

Monday, 15 October 2012, Afternoon

15.30

Rio Conventions Pavilion

UNCCD/IFOAM

LAND DAY 6:  LAND DEGRADATION NEUTRALITY  -  A RESPONSE TO THE 2020 AICHI TARGETS

Tuesday, 16 October 2012, Evening

18:15 – 19:45

HALL I – Ground Level

LA VIA CAMPESINA

PEASANT SEEDS AND AGROECOLOGY: FOOD SOVEREIGNTY IN THE PRACTICE Key solutions to help countries and rural communities adapt to a changing climate in the midst of nutritional and financial crises.

Thursday, 18 October 2012, Evening

18:15 – 19:45

Room 2.01 – Level 2

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION

GLOBALLY IMPORTANT AGRICULTURAL HERITAGE SYSTEMS (GIAHS): A LEGACY FOR THE FUTURE! The Food and Agriculture Organization recognizes the enormous contributions and important role of family farmers, indigenous peoples and local communities in managing, conserving and sustaining our biodiversity. Ten years after its initiation by FAO in 2002, during the World Summit on Sustainable Development, the Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems Initiative (GIAHS) represents a sophisticated framework for the recognition, dynamic conservation of remarkable systems of agriculture with their agricultural biodiversity, associated biodiversity, knowledge systems, cultures and landscapes, to achieve food security nutrition and livelihoods. GIAHS Initiative emphasizes balance between conservation, adaptation and socio-economic development – sustaining agriculture development while maintaining the harmony between nature and people. The side event is aimed to showcase humanity’s agricultural heritage systems and the fundamental role of family farmers, indigenous and local communities in addressing the Aichi targets and to support the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020.